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Femme · Nurse · Belgium

“The emotional aspect of mobility is more than just being able to move around’’

Keeping my mobility as high as possible is a very important thing for meI just want to be there for my son in every step of his process in growing up.”  


One night before a celebration, x-rays showed Femme was living with multiple-sclerosis (MS)Now struggling with limited mobility, Femme is motivated by her family; especially her partner and son Arvo – her main motivation. 

“If there is something new, take a breath, look at it, see how you can cope with it, re-adapt and move on; again, and again, and again.”  

The ability to move means very little to her without connecting to the emotions that continued mobility represents. When she sees Arvo smiling, she is reminded of the goal to keep going; one step at a time. Even with pain and fatigue, she experiences the challenges of limited mobility with determinationconstantly striving to reach her own personal goals, despite immense physical difficulties.

’’If I can just have the opportunity to be a mum as long as I can, I will be very happy.’’ 
For Femme, empowering movement means so much more than being mobile as it allows her to be present in her family’s everyday life and even in her own. She draws strength from these moments and in daily tasks, such as watching her son play footballEmpowering movement enriches her life, allowing her to continue to face her disease with motivation.